I debated posting about Yanaka’s “Kinji"… it’s one of my favorite shops and is somewhat "secret". I don’t even know how I found it. It’s not terribly hidden, but you do have to wander.

They carry traditional-Japanese-style accessories along with these weird & wonderful little dolls called “maru”.

Photos via Kinji and Takasumi.

Time Out Tokyo: Lemon no Mi (Info & Google Maps)

Having opened towards the end of 2010, Lemon no Mi has quickly established itself as a ‘Yanesen’ favourite, and it’s easy to see why. Everything about the tiny restaurant smacks of the Yanaka way of life, from the dilapidated exterior to the eat-what-you’re-served home cooking concept, and its reputation is growing rapidly.
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The Lemon no Mi concept is not particularly unusual, but it still raises a smile. Maiko, the proprietress, cooks a single lunchtime dish each day according to the ingredients she has and the mood that takes her. No matter what it is, it’ll cost you ¥1,200 – a snip when you consider that the meal is split over a number of substantial courses and leaves you wanting for nothing more. The lunchtime ‘menu’ stops being served as soon as it sells out, so hopeful diners should try and get there before 1pm, to be on the safe side.

Time Out Tokyo: Lemon no Mi (Info & Google Maps)

Having opened towards the end of 2010, Lemon no Mi has quickly established itself as a ‘Yanesen’ favourite, and it’s easy to see why. Everything about the tiny restaurant smacks of the Yanaka way of life, from the dilapidated exterior to the eat-what-you’re-served home cooking concept, and its reputation is growing rapidly.

The Lemon no Mi concept is not particularly unusual, but it still raises a smile. Maiko, the proprietress, cooks a single lunchtime dish each day according to the ingredients she has and the mood that takes her. No matter what it is, it’ll cost you ¥1,200 – a snip when you consider that the meal is split over a number of substantial courses and leaves you wanting for nothing more. The lunchtime ‘menu’ stops being served as soon as it sells out, so hopeful diners should try and get there before 1pm, to be on the safe side.

SCAI THE BATHHOUSE*

SCAI THE BATHHOUSE is a contemporary art gallery known for introducing Japan’s avant-garde artists to the world as well as for helping exceptional artists from abroad to establish a presence in Japan. SCAI has a strong track-record of large-scale exhibitions presenting artists such as Lee Ufan and Tadanori Yokoo who led the genesis of Japanese contemporary art, and Toshikatsu Endo, Tatsuo Miyajima, and Mariko Mori who brought Japanese contemporary art to the world’s attention in the latter half of the ’80s and the ’90s by showing their works in international exhibitions. Through their association with SCAI, international artists such as Anish Kapoor and Julian Opie have produced new series of works inspired by Japanese traditional culture and crafts.

If you make it out to Yanaka / Ya•Ne•Sen (which you definitely should, as it’s one of the most charming, interesting, cultural/historical areas in Tokyo), definitely stop by SCAI.

SCAI THE BATHHOUSE*

SCAI THE BATHHOUSE is a contemporary art gallery known for introducing Japan’s avant-garde artists to the world as well as for helping exceptional artists from abroad to establish a presence in Japan. SCAI has a strong track-record of large-scale exhibitions presenting artists such as Lee Ufan and Tadanori Yokoo who led the genesis of Japanese contemporary art, and Toshikatsu Endo, Tatsuo Miyajima, and Mariko Mori who brought Japanese contemporary art to the world’s attention in the latter half of the ’80s and the ’90s by showing their works in international exhibitions. Through their association with SCAI, international artists such as Anish Kapoor and Julian Opie have produced new series of works inspired by Japanese traditional culture and crafts.

If you make it out to Yanaka / Ya•Ne•Sen (which you definitely should, as it’s one of the most charming, interesting, cultural/historical areas in Tokyo), definitely stop by SCAI.